' Here and Now '...


“This is the real secret of life --

to be completely engaged with what you are doing in the here and now.

And instead of calling it work,

realize it is play.”



― Alan W. Watts

' Our true nature '...


The knowledge you are seeking about your true state is unknowable because comprehension at the mind level is only conceptual and therefore totally illusory.

What you are seeking is what you ALREADY ARE.

We neither exist nor not exist.

Our true nature is neither presence nor absence but the annihilation of both.


-A Net of Jewels
Ramesh S. Balsekar



' Unchanging Truth '...


How can a mental state be the final realization?

It is temporary.

Mystic experience is such a state.

It is something one enters and leaves.

Beyond and higher is realization of unchanging truth.




-- Notebooks Category 16: The Sensitives >
Chapter 2: Phases of Mystical Development > # 29
Paul Brunton

Van Morrison - Enlightenment (Audio)

' I am that I was '...


"I am that I was and that I shall remain now and forever.

Then I receive an impulse which carries me above all angels.

In this impulse I conceive such passing riches that I am not content with God as being God, as being all his godly works, for in this breaking-through I find that God and I are both the same.

Then I am what I was, I neither wax nor wane, for I am the motionless cause that is moving all things."



Meister Eckhart
Franz Pfeiffer, editor
The Works of Meister Eckhart
Translated by C. de B. Evans,
London: John M. Watkins, 1924, vol 1, p. 221

' Stinginess '...


One day Mulla Nasruddin saw a crowd gathered around a pond. A Muslim
priest with a huge turban on his head had fallen in the water and was
calling for help. People were leaning over and saying, "Give me your
hand, Reverend! Give me your hand!" But the priest didn't pay
attention to their offer to rescue him; he kept wrestling with the
water and shouting for help.

Finally the Mulla stepped forward. "Let me handle this." He
stretched out his hand toward the priest and shouted at him, "Take my
hand!"

The priest grabbed the Mulla's hand and was hoisted out of the
pond. People, very surprised, asked the Mulla for the secret of his
strategy.

"It is very simple," he replied, "I knew this miser wouldn't give
anything to anyone. So instead of saying, 'Give me your hand,' I
said, 'Take my hand,' and sure enough he took it."



Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi
as collected by James Fadiman & Robert Frager


' Two ways to Realization '...


There are two different ways to realization:

(a) The path of yoga meditation whose goal is nirvikalpa samadhi.

(b) Gnana whose goal is sahaja samadhi.

This looks on the world as being only a picture, unreal.

Both seek and reach the same Brahman, the world disappearing for both.



-- Notebooks Category 25: World-Mind in Individual Mind >
Chapter 2: Enlightenment Which Stays > # 130 Paul Brunton


' Tao Te Ching '...


Between birth and death,
Three in ten are followers of life,
Three in ten are followers of death,
And men just passing from birth to death also number three in ten.
Why is this so?
Because they live their lives on the gross level.

He who knows how to live can walk abroad
Without fear of rhinoceros or tiger.
He will not be wounded in battle.
For in him rhinoceroses can find no place to thrust their horn,
Tigers no place to use their claws,
And weapons no place to pierce.

Why is this so?
Because he has no place for death to enter.



- Lao-tzu
Tao Te Ching
Translation by Gia-fu Feng and Jane English
Vintage Books Edition, September 1972

' Beyond the shadow '...


~This passage is from Thomas Merton's posthumous Asian Journal, describing his awakening experience upon seeing the great Buddha statues at Polonnaruwa, Ceylon (Sri Lanka):

“Looking at these figures I was suddenly,
almost forcibly, jerked clean out of the habitual, half-
tied vision of things, and an inner clearness, clarity, as
if exploding from the rocks themselves, became evident
and obvious.

The queer evidence of the reclining
figure, the smile, the sad smile of Ananda standing with
arms folded (much more ‘imperative’ than Da Vinci’s
Mona Lisa because completely simple and
straightforward).

The thing about all this is that there is
no puzzle, no problem, and really no ‘mystery.’ All
problems are resolved and everything is clear, simply
because what matters is clear. The rock, all matter, all
life, is charged with dharmakaya . . .

everything is
emptiness and everything is compassion. I don’t know
when in my life I have ever had such a sense of beauty
and spiritual validity running together in one aesthetic
illumination.

Surely, with Mahabalipuram and
Polonnaruwa my Asian pilgrimage has come clear and
purified itself. I mean, I know and have seen what I
was obscurely looking for. I don’t know what else
remains but I have now seen and have pierced through
the surface and have got beyond the shadow and the
disguise.”


~from The Asian Journal of Thomas Merton,

' Escaping difficulties '...


There is no permanent way of escaping difficulties other than the way of seeking spiritual realization.

That is what we have really incarnated for.

This may seem hard on us,

but life on earth as it is known today is also hard for many people.




-- Notebooks Category 13: Human Experience >
Chapter 1: Situation > # 394 Paul Brunton